Marcus Miller began his studies in saxophone at age nine and, with the help of World Renown Saxophonist Bruce Williams (Roy Hargrove, World Saxophone Quartet), he developed a passion that put him on stage professionally at 13. With gifts extending beyond the music, he graduated from Harvard University with a degree in Mathematics. After a short stint at a multibillion dollar hedge fund he moved to New York City to pursue music. He soon developed a reputation as a versatile and virtuosic player, while studying music production and engineering under Grammy-winning Engineer “Bassy” Bob Brockman (Notorious B.I.G, Herbie Hancock, D'Angelo).

 

Marcus has performed at the Obama White House, Madison Square Garden, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert alongside Jon Batiste, Carnegie Hall, as well as recorded with Benny Blanco and Ryan Tedder. He regularly performs at major jazz venues like The Blue Note and Dizzy's, is featured at the Daybreaker series of morning raves, and has toured internationally with various groups ranging from New Orleans Hot Jazz to Indie Rock. In addition, he is a speaker at the New Jersey Association of Music Educators, discussing music production and education, and was noted as an Artist of Distinction by the state of New Jersey.

 

 
 

Marcus maintains his interest in mathematics and physics, giving talks and working with gifted youth. He continues his studies independently under scholars at Columbia, Princeton, and Juilliard. In 2017, he began presenting about the relationship between math and music, giving a presentation that includes both musical performance as well as exploration into various topics in mathematics and physics. Since beginning he has spoken at the University of Michigan and the National Museum of Mathematics in New York City. In addition he is building Selam Salon, a space in Harlem that brings creatives, technical thinkers, and entrepreneurs together to share ideas and impact the future.

 

Photographs featuring Leo Sorel

May not music be described as the mathematics of the sense, mathematics as music of the reason?
— James Joseph Sylvester